Incremental Steps

Recently I have been working on editing the Te Pae Tata report. This is an in depth report designed to help whānau and rangatahi navigate the current job market post COVID-19. 

The editing process is a chance to refine the report including changing the name to better reflect the intent of the report. The original name was Te Kete Pukenga, but we decided to change this to Te Pae Tata because the report is really about supporting whānau and rangatahi to find short- term career solutions that ultimately lead to long-term success. I now feel much better about how clear the intent of the report is when it comes to the whakataukī that overarches the purpose of the report. 

My role in this whole process was to bring both editing suggestions together and create a final draft ready for the design process. Seeing those small incremental changes in the words and the report structure was great learning with regards how to maximise the utility of the report. Before the editing process, the report felt a bit disjointed and really just overwhelmed the reader with lots of facts. It was great to get some help from my colleagues Eruera and Adrienne and to see the final report take shape. 

I believe editing is a good self reflection process where you can learn more about the gaps in your work, and how you can make improvements for your next project. However, I also learned that I need to get more involved in this process and be more confident in identifying the parts that need work.

Upon reflecting I can see that I have avoided editing in the past because it can seem menial. Having been involved in the process I now see that it is an important step in creating any quality research report. I have also learnt that I need to include myself and my co-authors more in the editing process and that I need to be less hesitant about making my own suggestions – which could include disagreeing with others’ suggestions as well. I think that this might be easier in face-to-face hui could help solve many of the small issues resulting from editing online.

A pattern I see emerging in my practice is around self confidence. I can see that it’s important to not be overly confident and resist other’s suggestions, but at the same time being hesitant when putting our own whakaaro forward is not useful either. This is especially true during the editing phase when every incremental step counts.

Incremental Steps

I have been working on the editing phase of the Te Pae Tata report. It will be an in depth report for whanau and rangatahi to navigate the jobs market. A major change in the report was the change in title to reflect the intention of the report (from Te Kete Pukenga to Te Pae Tata) which is a focus on short term career solutions for long term success.

During this process I have been feeling encouraged. Some important points I remember were the suggestions that both Adi and Eru gave for the report. Before this whole process, the report felt a bit disjointed and overwhelming with facts. I also feel much better about how clear the intention of the report is now when it comes to the whakatauki that overarches the purpose of the report. My role in this whole process was to bring both editing suggestions together and create a final draft that can be sent through the design process. Seeing those small incremental changes in the words and the report structure was a great learning process on how to maximise the utility of the report. 

I think the work could be a bit better if I put a bit more of my own and Ari’s suggestions in the report. I believe editing is a good self reflection process where you can learn more about the gaps in your work, and helps you to improve on your next project. However, I also try to avoid editing because it can be a menial process. I think a good way to get involved more in the editing process is by developing my confidence in identifying the parts that are falling behind, and not being hesitant in chucking suggestions out there in the editing process. That could include disagreeing with others’ suggestions as well.

The practical steps I need to take is to include myself and Ari more in the editing process. Another simple step would be to increase my self-confidence so I can disagree if I really need to. I think face to face huis as well would help solve much of these small issues in the editing process.

I think the pattern that I have been seeing in my practice is self confidence. Not being overly confident where you are insistent on your wrong suggestions, but rather not being hesitant when putting out your own whakaaro on certain parts in the process (or in this case during the editing phase.) I think I should communicate with Eru, Adi and Ari to talk about this when we go through the next monthly report. Probably it would be best face to face rather than through email correspondence.

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